Peters Hill

Peters Hill (Informal name, northwest of Toby Creek Bridge in Athalmer)

“Morning wasn’t morning until the Peters’ had made their daily milk delivery.”31

Anyone who has gone up to Panorama has driven up Peters Hill – it’s the local name for that steep hill just on the other side of the bridge over Toby Creek. Peters Hill is named after the Peters family, who arrived in the Valley from England in March 1912.

Harry Peters

Henry Hugh Peters was born on 14 April 1882 in Chew Stoke in Somerset, England (south of Bristol) as the fourth son in a farming family.1 His parents, Francis Hugh Peters and Emma Peters (née Pearce), had a fifty acre farm (Bridge Farm) on Stanton road (you can search for this on Google and see a street view of some lovely stone buildings).2

As typical in a farming family, Henry (Harry) grew up working on the farm. His help would have been particularly useful following his father’s death, in January 1906,3 after which his mother took over its operation.4

Amy Louisa Baber

At age 29, in 1911, still working on the family farm, Harry’s life got a bit more interesting when he met Amy Louisa Baber. Amy Louisa was also born to a farming family, on 19 September 1878, less than ten kilometres away from Chew Stoke in Hinton Blewett.5

Her family, including parents Joseph and Fanny Baber (née Harris),6 along with five (later seven) siblings, moved when Amy was quite young to Queen Charlton, where Amy seems to have spent her childhood. Her family was relatively successful, with her father in 1881 farming 137 acres and employing three labourers.7

Nonetheless, Amy left home, likely in her late teen years, as in 1901 she could be found living in East Harptree, Somerset with her cousin (either Richard M Dudden or his wife, Louisa A Duddon). Louisa was a cheese maker,8 no doubt giving Amy experience in similar work, as ten years later she was working as a dairy maid and housekeeper at a farm in Chew Magna, just a few kilometres away from Harry Peters down in Chew Stoke.9

Wedding and Departure

Harry and Amy were married in on 31 January 1912, each with an elder brother present as witness.10 Within two months, the newly married couple were on the Empress of Ireland to Canada, destination Golden B.C., arriving at St John, New Brunswick on 16 March 1912.11 Amy arrived heavily pregnant, as less than one month after that, on 15 April 1912, their first son, Joseph Harry Peters, was born.12

This was, to the numerically inclined, very much a rushed marriage, likely prompted at least in part by an unexpected pregnancy, and followed by a rapid departure to a new country.

That opportunity to leave the country was also likely a matter of lucky circumstance. According to a later remembrance, Amy had heard from Eldred Walker, the editor of a Bristol newspaper, that CPR publicist John Murray Gibbon was looking for someone to manage and work his property in the Windermere Valley as a model farm for the Columbia Valley Irrigation Fruitlands Co (CVIF).13 As a young couple, both with extensive farming experience, and looking for a fresh start, the Peters family was a good fit for the position.

Still, it was a dramatic and sudden change for the couple. Amy later recalled it taking three days for them to travel from Golden down to Invermere, “along the hardly used trail that was later to become a major highway. They even had some musical accompaniment in the form of a man named Gifford, who sang “Daisy, Daisy” throughout the entire 3 day journey.”14 It was a long, long ways from Somerset.

Cydervale Farm

With newborn Joe, the Peters’, “embarked on their new life complete with English chickens and even a plough.”15 Then working for $40 a month,16 they were tasked with establishing and operating the Gibbon model farm known as “Cydervale.” Harry soon cultivated three orchards, including over 500 apple trees, with red and black currant bushes planted in between rows.17 There were also large vegetable gardens, acres of potatoes, and hay fields, with the Peters family living in a manager’s home, which was soon joined by a number of other farm buildings.18

Fruit trees (to the right) on Cydervale Farm overlooking the Columbia River. The manager’s farmhouse is nestled among the trees in the centre of the photo. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, A1274.

A hay harvest with the model farmhouse in background. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, C328.

The Peters family, meanwhile, soon grew with the arrival of Joan Mary on 18 May 1914,19 and Ruth Louise on 6 October 1916.20

The Social Side

The couple also slipped into Valley life, with Harry soon attending meetings of the local Farmers Institute,21 an organization for which he soon volunteered as a director. He continued to serve in that capacity, as near as I can tell, for over three decades.22 Harry was also, later, a director of the Windermere District Stockbreeders Association,23 as well as the Windermere Co-Operative Creamery Association. 24

Harry saw success as a farmer, winning awards in various agricultural competitions over the years, particularly for pigs and potatoes, but also alfalfa, beets, poultry, fruit, grain, and, in 1934, a particularly large pumpkin (around 47 pounds).25 He is described in a 1921 newspaper article as, “an Old Country farmer of the best type, [who] is known all through the valley as one of the most successful of settlers.”26

A Shift to Dairy

That success, of course, would not have been possible without Amy. At first, Cydervale was operated primarily as a fruit farm, but in spring 1918, a registered Holstein Bull (named “Kitchener”), along with a herd, was acquired,27 and the property was converted to a dairy farm.28

By this time, the property included CVIF Lots 10, 11, and 12, all bordering Toby Creek, along with the south half of Lot 27 up the hill, which was also owned by the Gibbon family. (The northern-most property, Lot 10, was subdivided in 1921 with the southern half remaining with the Gibbons, and the northern half going to Harry Peters.)

A 1910 map of the Columbia Valley Irrigated Fruit Lands properties, with Cydervale marked. The northern half of Lot 10 was sold to Harry Peters in 1921. The black line marking the bottom is Toby Creek. Map adapted from the Provincial Archives of BC, with this version found in Cole Harris and Elizabeth Phillips, eds., Letters from Windermere, 1912-1914 (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1984)

Amy’s experience as a dairy maid would have been very useful on the dairy farm, and the three kids learned quickly. As a teenager, son Joe “became a familiar sight with his milk urn and the 1922 model T,”29 as he and his sisters were up early every morning to deliver milk to homes in Invermere and other Valley communities.30 So ubiquitous were the three that, to a certain generation living in the area through the 1920s and 1930s, “morning wasn’t morning until the Peters’ had made their daily milk delivery.”31

Milk cows on the dairy farm operated by the Peters family. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, C325.

Joe Peters on a milk delivery run. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives A1268.

Amy, once her children were a bit older and she had more time on her hands, also became active with the Women’s Auxiliary of the Anglican parish at Christ Church, where she served as president in the 1930s,32 and with the Windermere District Hospital Ladies Aid, serving as a vice president for a number of years.33

In addition, the Peters’ farm through in 1930s played host to a couple of community events, including a garden party in 1931 that featured refreshments and dancing on the lawn, (Anne Murray Gibbon, who spent summers with her children at her summer house on the hill, trained up the young people in these dances).34 A field day for the Windermere District Farmers Institute was also hosted by the Peters in 1934.35

Gathering at the Peters home. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, A1278.

The Property is Sold

The Gibbon family sold their portion of land, including all tools and dairy equipment, in 1948 to Ben Bennett,36 after which Harry and Amy continued to live in a small house on the property (likely on the Peters’ section of land – in 1921 Harry is noted as owning his own home).37

They later moved to Invermere, along Pipe Line Road (later 13th Ave), where Harry passed away on 10 November 1952.38 Amy suffered a fall sometime following, resulting in a serious hip injury, after which she lived with her daughter and son in law (Joan and Jack Solinger) in Invermere.39

Amy passed away on 31 January 1961 in Invermere.40 From the sources I was able to find, Harry and Amy returned just once to England, spending the winter of 1923/24 there along with all three of their children.41

The Peters Children

The eldest of the Peters children, Joe, grew up on the farm, attending the one room school house in Athalmer with his sisters. Joe, “would rather have forgone that experience. He remembers in particular when his entire Grade 8 class failed the year, a class of 15 pupils, “”and the whole lot of us didn’t make it” he laughed, “and Joan caught up to me!””42 He would later attend a year in Vancouver at UBC completing an agricultural course.

After the farm was sold, meanwhile, Joe became, “the number one oil furnace installation and repair man in the Valley.”43 This was likely just one of his jobs, however, as his occupation on his death certificate is listed as a “carpenter.”

Joe was also very active in sports, to the point that, according to his obituary, “Joe Peters and the word “sport” are almost synonymous in the Windermere District. He was active in all sports, but excelled at softball and basketball, curling and golf.”44 Joe is mentioned at times as secretary of the Invermere Badminton club, in 1936,45 a member of the Radium and Fairmont Golf Clubs,46 and vice president of the Invermere Curling Club, in 1942 and 1945.47 So involved was Joe in curling that at some point the Invermere Curling Rink was named the Joe Peters Curling Rink in his honor.48

He was involved in other organizations as well, including the Invermere Rotary Club (becoming an life-time honorary member), and the Canadian Legion.49

Joe passed away on 18 January 1988 in Invermere away after a lengthy illness.50 He was remembered as, “an ardent competitor in all sports, but a good portion of his enjoyment of athletic endeavours was the camaraderie and friendship that went along with participation. Joe was rich in friends. Joe knew the true meaning of friendship. He had many, many friends and they all rallied around him in his last months of illness.”51

Joan

Joan Mary, born in 1914, was also happy to grow up on a farm, proudly listing her occupation as “farmerette” when she was married in December 1938 to John Frank (Jack) Solinger, a labourer then living in Athalmer.52

Joan was active in sports as well, being among the “star performers” of the Lake Windermere basketball team in a game played in the David Thompson Memorial Fort in May 1931.53 She went on to take a business course at a college in Nelson through 1932.54

Joan and Jack Solinger remained in the Valley following their marriage. Jack joined up during the Second World War, enlisting in April 1942 and serving overseas as a Lieutenant Corporal with the 28th Armored Regiment (BC Regiment), seeing considerable action in Northwest Europe.55 Following his return, he worked in the logging industry, and passed away in July 1991 in Invermere.56 Joan, meanwhile, worked as a bookkeeper at Weirs Motors. She passed away in November 1997, survived by one daughter, Louise Marilynn Samletszi (later Collier).57

Ruth

The youngest, Ruth, paved her own way, notably becoming “Invermere’s first hairdresser,”58 after taking a course in Vancouver in 1935.59 She carried on in this profession until December 1940, when she married Norman Lawson Ruffle, the son of Alfred James and Ada Franse Ruffle of Canal Flats.60

Norman was then living in Vancouver, where he worked as a heavy machinery mechanic, and the couple moved there following their wedding. By 1946, the Ruffles were living in Prince George,61 while in 1961 they are reported at Vernon.62

Soon after, they landed in Burnaby, where Norman passed away in July 1972.63 Ruth continued to work as a bus driver, and she passed away at her home in Burnaby in October 1994.64 The Ruffles had one daughter, Lynne Davies.

Legacy

Markers for all of the Peters family can be found at the Windermere Cemetery, where Harry and Amy are both buried (their children are remembered with plaques).

Cydervale, also known as Peters Hill Farm, went on to be purchased by Hans and Rosa Hefti in 1955, who carried on with the dairy farm for a couple of years before turning to beef cattle. The property was sold in 1972 to Felix Austin, who in turn sold to George Deck.65 Kasper Heiz also later owned the property.66

There continued to be a sign there for Peters Hill Farm in the late 1990s when my parents brought by brother and I there to choose our first puppy (I’ll always have a soft spot for Peters Hill Farm due entirely to that bundle of energy).

See Also

John Murray Gibbon
David Thompson Memorial Fort
Invermere
Wilmer

Footnotes

1. Birth Registration of Henry Hugh Peters, Apr-May-Jun 1882, Clutton, Somerset, England, Vol 5C, Page 584, FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Birth Registration Index, 1837-2008”. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:99DM-25ZD
Baptismal Record of Henry Hugh Peters, 6 August 1882, Chew Stoke, Somerset, England, Parish records (Anglican), page 78, CHEW S 2/1/7, Somerset Archives, FamilySearch database, “England, Somerset, Church Records, 1501-1999.” https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:4BR7-3S1N
Death Registration of Henry Hugh Peters, 10 November 1952, Reg No 1952-09-010625, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/3bb1611c-2174-4e6d-828c-6f4b151c9f6c
2. England and Wales Census 1881, Chew-Stoke, Reg District Clutton, Somerset, England, Folio 2426/111, page 28 (family of Francis H Peters), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1881”. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:QLSC-3RHV
England and Wales Census 1891, Enumeration District 2, Chew Magna, Reg District Clutton, Somerset, England, Folio 1925/15, page 2 (family of Francis K Peters), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1891”. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:W5F8-N6Z
3. Death Registration of Francis Hugh Peters, Jan-Feb-Mar 1906, Clutton, Somerset, England, Vol 5C, page 353, FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Death Registration Index 1837-2007.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2NYR-W5T
Probate record for Francis Hugh Peters, 13 May 1913, Somerset, England, FamilySearch database, “England and Wales, National Index of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1957.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:QR1K-VTD9
4. England and Wales Census 1911, Enumeration District 2, Sub-District Chew Magna, Registration District Clutton, Somerset, England, Folio 103, page 6 (Emma Peters), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1911.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X7RJ-P8P
5. Birth Registration of Amy Louisa Baber, Oct-Nov-Dec 1878, Clutton, Somerset, England, Vol 5C, page 570, FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Birth Registration Index, 1837-2008.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:998R-RXYZ
Baptismal Record of Amy Louisa Baber, 16 October 1878, Hinton Blewitt, Somerset, England, Parish records (Anglican), page 86, D/P/HIN BL 2/1/6, Somerset Archives, FamilySearch database, “England, Somerset, Church Records, 1501-1999.” https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:4BR7-3BPW
Death Certificate of Louisa Amy Peters, 31 January 1961, Reg No 1961-09-002222, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/bb57591c-bf4d-49ce-993e-f3a6aa244ecc
6. Marriage Notice of Joseph Baber and Fanny Harris in the Wells Journal (Somerset, England), 14 April 1866, p 4, FamilySearch database “British Newspaper Archive, Family Notices.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:2:QRPV-KXPZ
7. England and Wales Census 1881, Queen Charlton, Reg District Keynsham, Somerset, England, Folio 2449/72, page 8 (Amy L Baber), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census 1881.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q276-JWF8
England and Wales Census 1891, Queen Charlton, Enumeration District 5, Reg District Keynsham, Somerset, England, Folio 1945/62, page 1 (Amy Louisa Baber), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census 1891.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:WRSM-D3Z
8. England and Wales Census 1901, East Harptree, Sub-District Harptree, Reg District Clutton, Somerset, England, Folio 44, page 1 (Amy L Baber), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census 1901.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XS8J-N3D
9. England and Wales Census 1911, Enumeration District 2, Sub-District 2 (Chaw Magna), Reg District Clutton, Somerset, England, Folio 97, page 6 (Amy Louisa Baber), FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census 1911.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X7RJ-P8Z
10. Marriage Registration of Henry Hugh Peters and Amy Louisa Baber, 31 January 1912, Reg No 339, page 170, St Andrews Church, Register of Marriages Chew Magna No 14 (1837-1914); “Somerset Parish Records, 1938-1914,” Reference Number: D\P\che.m/2/1/12, Somerset Heritage Service, Taunton, Somerset, England. Ancestry.com, “Somerset, England, Marriage Registers, Bonds and Allegations, 1754-1914.”
11. Henry R Peters, Empress of Ireland, arriving St John New Brunswick 16 March 1912, Department of Employment and Immigration Fonds, Series RG 76-C; Roll: T-4825, Library and Archives Canada, Ancestry.com, “Canada, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1865-1935,” [database on-line].
12. Death Certificate of Joseph Harry Peters, 18 January 1988, Invermere, Reg No No 1988-09-002612, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/e1feb5f9-504f-440c-a01f-1bc473e2e06a
13. “Mrs Harry Peters,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (May 2010), p 4 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
14. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
15. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
16. “Mrs Harry Peters,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (May 2010), p 4 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
17. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
18. Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013), p 38. https://windermeredistricthistoricalsociety.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/ranches-in-the-windermere-valley.pdf
19. Death Registration of Joan Mary Solinger, 1 November 1997, Invermere, Reg No 1997-09-022055, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/cd3a950d-4f6c-42b5-b7fe-5538e77fc4e7
20. Death Registration of Ruth Louise Ruffle, 14 October 1994, Burnaby B.C., Reg No 1994-09-020378, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/5185fd63-e106-4764-b125-6c8705eea293
21. “Columbia Valley Times, 31 November 1912,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (November 2006), p 3 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
22. “Annual Meeting,” Cranbrook Herald, 27 January 1916, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069847
“Windermere District Agricultural Ass’n,” The Cranbrook Herald, 3 February 1921, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070573
“Annual Meet’g of Windermere Farmers’ Inst, & Agric’l Assoc,” The Cranbrook Herald, 12 December 1924, p 11. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069547
“B.G. Hamilton is Head Windermere Farm Institute,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 6 February 1931, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0403930
“Farmers Institute has a Successful Year, Windermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 10 February 1932, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405562
“Marples Heads Farmers in the Windermere Dist.,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 15 November 1935, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405346
“J.A. Laird Reelected Pres Windermere Farmers’ Institute,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 10 December 1942, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0415499
23. “Stockbreeders of Windermere Dist. Hold Annual Meeting,” The Cranbrook Herald, 16 February 1922, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070597
24. “Production of Creamery Low in Windermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 25 February 1930, p 6. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404049
25. “Win Windermere Field Contest,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 20 August 1917, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0388126
“Stock Breeders of Windermere Hold Third Annual Show,” The Cranbrook Herald, 17 November 1921, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070493
“Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 19 November 1925, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069392
“‘Invermere Lad Sits with Boys in Parliament,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 6 January 1937, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0412383
“Canal Flat Couple Wed at Calgary,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 3 December 1934, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404596
26. Lukin Johnson, “Sees Much Promise in Windermere,” The Cranbrook Herald, 21 July 1921, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0068904
27. “Windermere District Board of Trade,” The Cranbrook Herald, 4 April 1918, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069806
28. Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013), p 38. https://windermeredistricthistoricalsociety.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/ranches-in-the-windermere-valley.pdf
29. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
30. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
31. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
32. “Successful Church Supper Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 10 April 1934, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405434
33. “Mrs Cartwright Heads Windermere Hosp Aid,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 9 October 1941, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0415169
“Mrs Cartwright Heads Hospital Aid at Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 8 October 1942, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0415462
34. “Invermere Plans for a Fall Fair,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 21 August 1931, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405480
“Invermere Women’s Association Gives a Lawn Social Event,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 1 September 1931, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0406034
35. “Big Field Day in Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 13 June 1934, p 7. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404626
36. Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013), p 39. https://windermeredistricthistoricalsociety.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/ranches-in-the-windermere-valley.pdf
37. “Old Timer Passes,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 2 February 1961, p 2.
Sixth Census of Canada, 1921, District 17 (Kootenay East), Sub-District (Columbia), Enumeration District 11 (Wilmer Rural), Page 1, Line 1-6 (family of Henery [sic] Peters). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4477676
38. Death Registration of Henry Hugh Peters, 10 November 1952, Invermere B.C., Reg No No 1952-09-010625, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/3bb1611c-2174-4e6d-828c-6f4b151c9f6c
39. “Old Timer Passes,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 2 February 1961, p 2.
40. Death Registration of Louisa Amy Peters, 31 January 1961, Invermere B.C., BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/bb57591c-bf4d-49ce-993e-f3a6aa244ecc
41. Montlaurier to Liverpool December 1923, Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and Successors: Inwards Passenger Lists, Class: BT26; Piece: 737; Item: 112; The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England. Ancestry.com database, “UK and Ireland, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.”
“Windermere District Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 9 November 1923, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069391
42. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
43. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
44. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
45. “Kirkpatrick is Badminton Head,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 18 November 1936, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0412503
46. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
47. “Invermere Curling Club Elect Officers,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 3 December 1942, p 7. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0415567
“Curling in Full Swing, Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 25 January 1925, p 10. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0416789
48. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
49. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
50. Death Certificate of Joseph Harry Peters, 18 January 1988, Invermere, Reg No No 1988-09-002612, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). http://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/e1feb5f9-504f-440c-a01f-1bc473e2e06a
“Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
51. “Oldtimer of the Valley Passes at Invermere,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 January 1988, p 3.
52. Marriage Registration of John Solinger and Joan Mary Peters, 7 December 1938, Invermere B.C., Reg No 1938-09-467985, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/469e88e1-14c4-44b2-96ce-b7dba9e1b5d3
53. “Windermere is Hoope Winner in Two Good Games,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 12 May 1931, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404221
54. “Invermere Miss is Taking Study Course in Nelson Course,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 1 February 1932, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405426
“Students Visit Invermere Homes,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 25 December 1932, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405964
55. “Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 7 February 1946, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0417768
56. Death Registration of John Frank Solinger, 18 July 1991, Invermere B.C., Reg No 1991-09-013490, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/ebf1106c-8709-4dec-9627-4cafab280c01
57. Death Registration of Joan Mary Solinger, 1 November 1997, Invermere B.C., Reg No 1997-09-022055, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/cd3a950d-4f6c-42b5-b7fe-5538e77fc4e7
58. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
59. “$140 for Hospital in Windermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 2 November 1935, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0406700
60. Miss R Peters of Athalmer Weds N Ruffle, Canal Flats,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 31 December 1940, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0414459
Marriage Registration of Norman Lawton Ruffle and Ruth Louise Peters, 26 December 1940, Invermere B.C., Reg No 1940-09-502476, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/05b8d245-3359-436f-b87f-2630598af697
61. “Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 4 October 1946, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0417982
62. “Old Timer Passes,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 2 February 1961, p 2.
63. Death Registration of Norman Lawson Ruffle, 1 July 1972, Burnaby B.C., Reg No 1972-09-010741, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/853bcf82-531a-4c89-a01c-b20964392376
64. Death Registration of Ruth Louise Ruffle, 14 October 1994, Burnaby B.C., Reg No 1994-09-020378, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/5185fd63-e106-4764-b125-6c8705eea293
65. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
66. “The Peters Family,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2006), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives], https://www.windermerevalleymuseum.ca/documents-newsletters/windermere-district-historical-society-newsletters/
Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013), p 39. https://windermeredistricthistoricalsociety.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/ranches-in-the-windermere-valley.pdf
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4 thoughts on “Peters Hill

  1. Another article bringing back many memories. Joe snd I shared birthdays and he made me a wooden doll crib when I was younger that I kept and passed on to my granddaughters.
    Thank you Alexandra

    Like

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