Paradise (1)

Paradise Mine/Paradise Ridge/Paradise Basin

“In its early days Hammond used to say it [the mine] should have been called the ‘Parasite’.” 46

– Read More>

Mineral King (2)

Mineral King Mine (former community, unofficial local name)

Although provincially classified as a small mine, the Mineral King Mine was the largest underground mining enterprise in the Windermere Valley.

– Read More>

Mineral King (1)

Mineral King Mine (former community, unofficial local name)

Those who examined the Mineral King property in these early years agreed that that it was, “very encouraging”24, but as the scattered investment in the property suggests, there were a number of factors impeding development.

– Read More>

Duchess

Duchess Peak (West of the head of Findlay Creek in the Purcell Wilderness Conservancy)

The first Duchess was sixty feet long with cabin accommodation for eight and an ability to carry forty tons of freight. She was flat bottomed, and could “get along… where there was a heavy dew, or if the ground was a little damp.”

– Read More>

Spillimacheen

Spillimacheen (Community), Spillimacheen River (Yaknusuki), Spillimacheen Glacier (Head of McMurdo Creek), Spillimacheen Range, Spillimacheen Mountain

Other names:
Spallumacheen, Spallumcheen, Speylumacheen, Spillamachene, Spillemacheen, Spillemachene, Spillemachine, Spillemcheen, Spill-e-mu-chem, Spillimacheene, Spillimachine, Spillimachene, Spillimachin, Spillomochene, Spillumacheen

“[W]e had lunch and rested the horses after which we started out for ‘Spillimacheen.’ I have spelt the name as above but it is open to any one wishing to spell it any other way to do so if he likes, the only part of the work about which there is any agreement being ‘Spil.'” 4 I would disagree. From the list of spellings I’ve encountered, I would argue that the most anyone has agreed upon on is “Sp.”

– Read More>

Bugaboos

Bugaboo Creek, flowing into the Columbia River
Bugaboos, mountain range
Bugaboo Spire, mountain
Bugaboo Provincial Park

Bugaboos / n / a nemesis; a real or imagined obstacle that cannot be overcome; something that always causes failure or bad luck.

– Read More>

Canal Flats (?akamukul)

Canal Flats Village, South end of Columbia Lake

Other Names: ?akamukul, Yaqa•n Nukiy, McGillivray’s Crossing/McGillivray’s Portage, Grohman, Canal, Canal Flat

“We… coast[ed] along the low rush-grown shore [of Columbia Lake] towards the south-western corner … We soon became aware that this marshy waste of rushes, grass, willows, and water swarmed with every sort of moisture-loving bird, from geese down to sand-pipers. … we began to paddle up what we guessed to be the arm leading to the landing. More than a mile we followed this delusive stream, remarkable for the numerous springs which everywhere gushed up from crater-like basins at the bottom, while round them grew the most beautiful and luxuriant water-weeds ever seen, their delicate filigree-work of many-hued leaves and tendrils all clearly defined in the limpid water.” (Lees and Clutterbuck, B.C. 1887: A Ramble in British Columbia, p 178-179.)

– Read More>

Nelson

Mount Nelson, Invermere area

This prominent peak was the first mountain in the Windermere Valley to be named by a European. It was then renamed, renamed, and renamed again before the powers that be finally decided to return back to that first European name: after a heroic British naval commander who was also known for an extended affair with another woman while both were married.

– Read More>

Baillie Grohman

Baillie Grohman Avenue (Canal Flats)

After the canal flats project failed to succeed, the entire venture was titled as “The Grohman Canal Swindle” and Baillie Grohman himself was shouldered with much of the blame for it.

– Read More>

Athalmer (Kwataqnuk)

Athalmer (Community), Athalmer Road

Other Names: Athalmere, Athelmar, Athelmer, Kwataq̓nuk, Salmon Beds

‘I like Athalmer. It has the air of a city, it carries itself well, with an assurance that sits well on it. … The town is planned on a generous scale, with wide streets and plenty of breathing space. … Who knows but some day the Canadian navy will ride at anchor in Lake Windermere.’
(The Columbia Valley Times, 7 December 1912)

– Read More>