Nixon

Nixon Creek, Nixon Lake

Nixon was “full of stories, both true and false, as an ideal guide ought to be.29

Walter Nixon

Walter James Nixon was born 12 June 1881 in Muskoka, Ontario as the second eldest child of John and Susan Nixon (née Henshaw).1 He would have four further siblings, all raised on the family farm near what is now the township of Muskoka Lakes (then the town of Medora and Wood).2

Westward Ho

In about 1900, Walter travelled west, and he can be found at age nineteen on the 1901 Canadian census working as a labourer in Banff, staying as a guest in another household.3 This was either a temporary job or acted as a stepping stone along the way, as he was soon living in Golden where he worked as a labourer and increasingly as a tourist guide.4

On 7 June 1906, at age twenty-four, Walter was married in Golden to Esther Owena Holbert, the twenty-year old daughter of James and Almira Holbert (née Huston or Houston).5

Esther had grown up in the village of Burks Falls, Ontario, just north of Muskoka Lakes, and her older sister Jane (or Jennie) had in 1893 married Thomas Alton.6 Sometime between 1894 and 1897, the Altons settled in the Columbia Valley near Galena (Spillimacheen),7 and this is likely what brought Esther west.

In another family-based meet-cute, Esther’s younger sister, Emma Marietta “Nettie”, would in 1917 marry Walter’s younger brother, Wilbert Wilson, in Brisco. Wilbert and Emma also settled in the Upper Columbia Valley.8

Married Life

Following their wedding in 1906, Walter and Esther spent their honeymoon travelling up towards Windermere Lake.9 Walter’s younger sister, Minnie, closest of his siblings to him in age, was living there at a logging camp with her husband, Isaac Albert White.10

Settling down in Galena, Walter was by this time a “well-known tourist guide”,11 and he supplemented his income with logging, applying in 1907 for various licenses to carry away timber in the area (along with his brother-in-law Tom Alton).12

Walter Nixon, Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, A349.

By the time of the 1911 census the Nixons had two children (Gordon and Susan),13 and the following year, 1912, Walter was employed as a deputy game warden, a position that he held until autumn 1917.14 The family then moved out to live near Kootenay Crossing, before the Banff-Windermere Highway was built,15 although Walter also apparently served for a couple of years as auditor for the public school in Galena (for the 1912/13 and 1914/15 school terms).16

Guiding Full Time

After leaving his game warden position, in 1917, Walter seems to have dedicated himself full time to being a guide. His name appears in 1919/20 working out of Brisco on a list of guides issued by the provincial game warden office, and although he had certainly worked as a guide previously, Walter soon became one of the go-to outfitters in the valley.17 In the summer of 1920 he was employed by Lewis R Freeman to guide a film crew up to the newly re-named Lake of the Hanging Glaciers – Lewis wrote a book about the trip, describing Nixon in a very favourable light, which no doubt helped Nixon’s business.18

Walter’s name soon became synonymous with the Lake of the Hanging Glaciers, and it was a regular part of his business to guide trips up there. He was the one to blaze a horse packing route up the valley to the lake,19 and he packed up timber to build a boat so that visitors would go right up to the ice wall of the glacier.20 Walter would, much later in 1926, be employed directing the extension of the motor road up Horsethief creek by five miles (eight kilometers) in order to make the horseback ride to the lake shorter.21

Walter did not confine his guiding to the Horsethief, however. Among many countless other trips, he could be found in 1920 guiding Louis Olivier Armstrong, brother to Captain Francis P Armstrong, into the Upper Kootenay River area to the Beaverfoot.22 Nixon, with Madeline Turnor as his assistant, also guided the first pack pony party over the newly completed Banff-Windermere Highway in late summer 1922.23 Years later, in 1926, he guided the first pack trip over the grade of the Golden-Yoho motor road as well.24

Walter Nixon and Madeline Turnor guiding a packhorse group through on the not yet open Banff-Windermere Highway. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, C134.

Everything a Guide Should Be

Walter’s renown as a guide grew through publicity and word of mouth, with his popularity due in no small part to his likeability. The glowing review of Nixon in Lewis Freeman’s 1920 book, for example, notes how Freeman had been given, “thoroughly first class service… from beginning to end. Nixon himself I was extremely well impressed with. He was a fine up-standing fellow of six feet or more, black-haired, black-eyed, broad-shouldered and a swell of biceps and thigh that even his loose-fitting mackinaws could not entirely conceal. … Like the best of his kind, Nixon was quiet-spoken and leisurely of movement, but with a suggestion of powerful reserves of both vocabulary and activity. I felt sure at first sight that he was the sort of man who could be depended upon to see a thing through whatever the difficulties, and I never had reason to change my opinion on that score.”25

Freeman goes on to share a couple of memorable words used by Nixon (“peckish” and “geesly” – the latter being “Nixon’s favourite term of contempt”), as well as a story Walter shared around the campfire about a time he had been caught overnight in a storm above timberline. In true Star Wars fashion, Nixon recounts surviving the weather by covering himself in the carcasses of two freshly shot goats.26

Walter Nixon securing a rope on a pack horse. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, C238.

Further descriptions of Nixon appear elsewhere in print. Banff-Windermere Highway horsewoman, Elizabeth Bailey Price, describes Walter succinctly as, “an interesting study, with his never failing good nature, his twenty-two years’ knowledge of guiding and his ability to make the finest pancakes that were ever turned in a frying pan.”27

Following a big game hunt up Kootenay River in 1924, Mr U.B. Cummings, of Tell City, Indiana, remarks how Walter Nixon was, “the most wonderful man I have ever been on a hunting trip with.”28 According to Cummings, Nixon was “full of stories, both true and false, as an ideal guide ought to be.”29

To Invermere

With Walter doing well with his outfitting business, he and Esther moved their family (there were then five children) to Invermere, where they can be found listed on the 1921 census.30

Aside from his guiding business, Walter was also involved in a wide range of outdoor and guiding related activities. In early 1919 he was on the first executive of the Windermere District Rod and Gun Club (Nixon is listed as living in Edgewater at the time).31 He remained part of the club for some years,32 even serving as part of a standing Game and Fish Committee with the Windermere District Board of Trade after the Rod and Gun Club temporarily disbanded sometime in 1922.33 When the club re-organized, in December 1924, Walter was elected vice president.34

An advertisement for W.J. Nixon and Sons – the family outfitting company. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, C192.

Walter also, in 1924, was a member of the organizing committee for the “Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies”, a social club aimed at encouraging travel on horseback through the Canadian Rockies, a love of outdoor life, the study of nature, and the customs of “Indians.”35 Trail Riders became a very popular organization, a counterpoint to the more strenuous mountain climbing Canadian Alpine Club, and the Riders issued a regular club bulletin and organized an annual trip, on which Walter worked as a guide.

In 1929, Walter returned to a game warden position with the provincial government, this time out of Invermere, and remained in that position at least through 1933.36 He then returned to working as a guide and outfitter, with his death certificate listing that he had last worked in that occupation on the very specific date of 15 October 1945.37 Walter reportedly retired due to poor health and Esther becoming invalid with servere arthritis.

Walter passed away in Invermere on 27 September 1952 after a sudden illness at his home in Wilmer.38

Esther’s arthritis, meanwhile, had confinined her to a wheelchair.39 She passed away 30 October 1971 in Invermere, at which time she had 16 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren.40

The Nixon Children

As a brief mention of the Nixon children (there were six of them, after all), beginning with the eldest, Gordon.

Gordon

Gordon was born in May 1907, and fairly quickly became the first of the Nixon boys to follow in their father’s footsteps.41 As later reported, “since shortly after being able to walk he put in most of his leisure moments on horseback either roaming by himself or accompanying his father on some of his far afield expeditions.”42

In 1920, fourteen-year old Gordon finagled his way into joining his father on the Lake of the Hanging Glaciers filming trip, reportedly “threaten[ing] to run away from home if he wasn’t allowed to come along. He proved a useful acquisition – more than sufficiently so, it seemed to me, to compensate for what he did to the jam and honey.”43

By 1928, at age twenty, Gordon had his own string of pack horses and was employed by a team of topographical surveyors.44 He spent the next two seasons doing such work until, in September 1930, Gordon and his two companions, Provincial Land Surveyor William Hallam Jr and assistant Alan Game, were drowned when their canoe overturned crossing the Columbia River north of Golden (this was before the Mica dam was built – the Columbia up there was rough).45 Walter rushed north to help search for the bodies, but there is no record of Gordon ever having been found (there is also no death certificate).

Susan

The next eldest Nixon was the only daughter, Susan Owena, born July 1909.46 Susan is mentioned a few times in the newspapers, including as a pupil of Miss Dora K Bodecker for a music recital in 1922,47 and receiving a prize “for morale and good citizenship” during the 1922/1923 school year.48 She was confirmed at the Invermere Anglican Church in 1923,49 the first confirmation held after the church had been consecrated that weekend, and Susan acted as an officer with the Windermere division of the Girl Guides in 1924.50

In July 1932, Susie married David Smart Broadfoot in Invermere.51 David listed his occupation at the time as a miner, although he had reportedly met Susan while working for Walter on his ranch.52

Dave would pass away on 19 January 1945 of a brain tumor, and Susan was remarried to Carl Pearson on 20 November 1948.53 She had nine children with Dave, and a daughter with Carl. Susan Pearson passed away in Invermere on 27 April 1992 at age 82.54

Jack

John (Jack) Hulbert Nixon, born c 1911, is next, and I was able to find very little about him. He was on the Lake Windermere baseball team in 1923 (along with a Lloyd and Benny Nixon, whom I cannot identify).55 He also served overseas in the Second World War with the 1st Canadian Scottish, married a woman named Rose, and went on to live in Spillimacheen and later Parsons. Jack passed away in Calgary at age 63 in April 1974. He had no children.56

Dave

We don’t have much more about David Charles Nixon. He was born 25 October 1913, and later reported starting guiding in 1932 for the family operation (2N), which was sold after the war (there’s an oral history with him at BC Archives, which would probably be an interesting listen).57

During the Second World War, Dave served overseas as a sergeant in the Canadian Scottish Regiment.58 Before he returned, he was married at the Isle of Wight to Ruby M Barton, in the summer of 1945.59 The couple returned to Canada and lived in Wilmer, where Dave worked at the sawmill. They had at least one son.60

Arthur

Arthur James is also a bit of a mystery, born 15 August 1917, and having lived at home until at least the time of his father’s death in 1952.61 Arthur passed away four years later, on 14 March 1956, while working as a labourer in road construction. The cause of death was some kind of dehydration/kidney rupture, but I was unable to access a corresponding newspaper account to explain the nature of the accident.62

Leigh/Lea

The youngest Nixon was Walter Leigh (sometimes Lea Walter), the baby of the family born 22 July 1922. Lea served in the Second World War, being promoted to Corporal in September 1943, before returning to the valley and marrying in March 1946 in Invermere to Mona Violet Campbell, a retail clerk then living in Vancouver.63

At the time of his wedding, Lea was a rancher,64 then living in Wilmer, although following his father’s death the Nixon ranch on Lot 8 (the previous Cuthbert Ranch) was passed on to him.65

Lea and Mona would later divorce, and Lea’s occupation is listed as a labourer at the time of his death on 10 August 1981 in Invermere.66

The Wilbert Nixons

The other Nixon family, that of Walter’s brother Wilbert and Esther’s sister Nettie/Emma, were living in 1921 in Radium Hot Springs with two children and with Wilbert making money as a rancher.67 Wibert later lists his occupation as a guide/trapper.68

Emma passed away in March 1958 in Golden, with her residence then being in Parson.69 Wilbert passed away in 1971, and is buried in the Golden cemetery next to his wife.70

Nixon Creek, located in Kootenay National Park, was named after Walter Nixon, while Nixon Lake, up near the Spillimacheen River, has an unknown provenance, being likely named after some member of the Nixon family.

See Also

Galena
Lake of the Hanging Glaciers
Francis P Armstrong

Footnotes

1. Birth Registration for Walter James Nixon, 12 June 1881, Muskoka, Reg No 019774, in FamilySearch database, “Canada, Ontario Births, 1869-1912,’’ citing Birth, Medora & Wood, Simcoe, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VNLT-7RQ
2. Census of Canada 1891, Ontario, District No 116 (Simcoe East), Sub-District No D (Medora and Wood), p 24, Family 122, (Walter Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1891/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=2605764
3. Census of Canada 1901, The Territories, District No 202 (Alberta), Sub-District F (Banff), Division No 1, Page 5, Family 45 (Walter Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1901/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=903885
4. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 22 March 1903, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/03/22/1/Ar00102.html
5. Marriage Registration of Walter James Nixon and Esther Holbert, 7 June 1906, Golden B.C., Reg No 1906-09-176668, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/906c1b97-2baf-4e12-a0b0-9c3afd494b23
Birth Registration of Esther Hobert, 1 March 1886, Simcoe/Victoria, Reg No 034923, p 639, in FamilySearch database, “Canada, Ontario Births, 1869-1912,” citing Birth, Ops Township, Victoria, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FMZB-1D9
6. Marriage Registration of Thomas Alton and Jennie Holbert, 29 November 1893, Reg No 008018, District of Parry Sound, Division of Burk’s Falls, Marriages – Registrations, Unit Number RG 80-5-0-206 (E), 1893, p 463, in FamilySearch database, “Canada, Ontario Marriages, 1869-1927,” citing registration, Burk’s Falls, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada, Archives of Ontario, Toronto. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FMV1-2BP
7. Census of Canada 1901, British Columbia, District No 5 (Yle and Cariboo), Sub-District No D (Kootenay East – North Riding), Division 4, Page 2, Family No 26 (Thomas Alton). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1901/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=15195
8. Marriage Registration of Wilbert Nixon and Nettie Holbert, 17 January 1917, Brisco, 1917-09-185523, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/1e368041-abcc-46fb-92fe-ef63a117e736
9. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 14 June 1906, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/06/14/1/Ar00103.html
10. Winnifred A Weir, “Esther and Walter Nixon,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2011), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2011_08.pdf
11. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 14 June 1906, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/06/14/1/Ar00103.html
12. “Timber Licenses,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 47, No 20, (16 May 1907), p 2658. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett47nogove_c3k9
“Timber Licenses,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 47, no 23 (6 June 1907), p 3233. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett47nogove_v9j7
13. Census of Canada 1911, British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District No 4 (Columbia), From Spillimacheon south to Stoddart Creek on east then to boundary line and to Horse Thief Creek on west then to boundary line., Page 1 (Walter Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=782719
14. British Columbia. Public Accounts for the Fiscal Year Ending 31st March, 1913 Period from 1st April 1912, to 31st March 1913 (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer, 1914), p C 41. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0059676
British Columbia. Public Accounts for the Fiscal Year Ending 31st March, 1918 Period from 1st April 1917, to 31st March 1918 (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer, 1919), p B 47. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0059658
15. Winnifred A Weir, “Esther and Walter Nixon,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2011), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2011_08.pdf
16. British Columbia. “Public School teachers and trustees during 1912-1913,” Forty-Second Annual Report of the Public Schools of the Province of British Columbia 1912-1913 by the Superintendent of Education with Appendices (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer, 1914), A cxlvi. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0059681
British Columbia. “Public School teachers and trustees during 1914-1915,” Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the Public Schools of the Province of British Columbia 1914-1915 by the Superintendent of Education with Appendices (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer, 1916), p A clxxv. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0059802
17. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. Annual Report of the Provincial Game Warden of the Province of British Columbia 1919 (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer, 1920), p O 27. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0224415
18. Lewis R. Freeman, Down the Columbia (New York: Dodd, Mead and Co, 1921), p 24. https://archive.org/embed/downcolumbia00free
19. Leah M Driesbach, “Lake of Hanging Glaciers a Wonder Place of Scenic Splendors,” The Spokesman Review (Spokane Washington), 4 December 1921, p 50. https://www.newspapers.com/image/566802323
20. V.M. Cummings, “Lake of the Hanging Glaciers,” The Province (Vancouver B.C.), 14 March 1926, p 47. https://www.newspapers.com/image/500397239
21. “New Road to Lake of the Hanging Glaciers,” The Province (Vancouver B.C.), 16 June 1926, p 7. https://www.newspapers.com/image/499241213
“Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 17 June 1926, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069397
22. “Three Hundred Miles by Canoe,” The Cranbrook Herald, 15 July 1920, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069502
23. Elizabeth Bailey Price, “Banff-Windermere Road Literally Chiselled Out of Mountain Rocks, and Hewed Through Great Forests of Towering Spruce and Pine,” The Calgary Herald, 30 September 1922, p 21. https://www.newspapers.com/image/480836580
24. “British Author Makes Pack Train Trip Over New Road,” The Cranbrook Herald, 26 August 1926, p 9. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069482
25. Lewis R. Freeman, Down the Columbia (New York: Dodd, Mead and Co, 1921), p 25. https://archive.org/embed/downcolumbia00free
26. Lewis R. Freeman, Down the Columbia (New York: Dodd, Mead and Co, 1921), p 45-46. https://archive.org/embed/downcolumbia00free
27. Elizabeth Bailey Price, “Banff-Windermere Road Literally Chiselled Out of Mountain Rocks, and Hewed Through Great Forests of Towering Spruce and Pine,” The Calgary Herald, 30 September 1922, p 21. https://www.newspapers.com/image/480836580
28. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 24 October 1924, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069649
“Indiana Big Game Hunter Praises Windermere Guide,” The Cranbrook Herald, 24 October 1924, p 6 [from the Golden Star]. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069649
29. Llewellyn Kitchell, “To the Lake of the Hanging Glaciers with the Canadian Trail Riders,” Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies Bulletin, No 18, (Oct 1928), p 2. https://archive.org/embed/N034149
30. Census of Canada 1921, British Columbia, District No 17 (Kootenay East), Sub-District 12 (Columbia), Invermere (Polling District), page 3, Family 19 (Walter Nickson [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4477975
31. “Game Club at Windermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 21 March 1919, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0389171
32. “Cranbrook Man Honored in Election of Officers of a Windermere Club,” The Cranbrook Herald, 18 March 1920, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070491
33. “Annual Report is Bright One,” The Cranbrook Herald, 8 June 1923, pp 1, 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070612
34. “Rod & Gun Club for Windermere District Revived,” The Cranbrook Herald, 12 December 1924, p 11. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069547
35. “Trail Riders of Canadian Rockies, New Organization,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 26 May 1924, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0401606
36. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. Province of British Columbia Department of Attorney-General Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner for the Year Ended December 31st, 1929 (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer), p H 60. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0300529
British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. Province of British Columbia Department of Attorney-General Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner for the Year Ended December 31st, 1933 (Victoria B.C.: Government Printer), p I 47. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0308220
37. Death Registration of Walter James Nixon, 27 September 1952, Invermere, Reg No 1952-09-009407, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/ae51bec9-bf17-42ff-8a58-34f81d56e7c7
38. Winn Weir, “Walter J Nixon, Well Known Guide, Passes at Invermere,” 2 October 1951 [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
Death Registration of Walter James Nixon, 27 September 1952, Invermere, Reg No 1952-09-009407, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/ae51bec9-bf17-42ff-8a58-34f81d56e7c7
39. Winnifred A Weir, “Esther and Walter Nixon,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2011), p 1 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2011_08.pdf
40. Death Registration of Esther Hulbert Nixon, 30 October 1971, Invermere, Reg No 1971-09-015152, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/c056814b-7d2d-4d00-96ba-5629a233931a
“Mrs Walter Nixon, Valley Pioneer Dies,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 4 November 1971, p 1.
41. Canada Census of 1911, British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District No 4 (Columbia), From Spillimacheon south to Stoddart Creek on east then to boundary line and to Horse Thief Creek on west then to boundary line, Page 1 (Gordon Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=782677
42. “Two Well Known Figures Pass in Windermere District,” 3 October 1930, [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
43. Lewis R. Freeman, Down the Columbia (New York: Dodd, Mead and Co, 1921), p 31-32. https://archive.org/embed/downcolumbia00free
44. “Two Well Known Figures Pass in Windermere District,” 3 October 1930, [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
45. “Survey Party Believed to Have Drowned,” The Daily Colonist (Victoria B.C.), 30 September 1930, p 1,2. https://archive.org/embed/dailycolonist193unse_p75
“Two Well Known Figures Pass in Windermere District,” 3 October 1930, [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
“Gordon Nixon and Two More Upset, Canoe,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 29 September 1930, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0400549
“Three B.C. Men Drown From Canoe,” [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
46. Canada Census of 1911, British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District No 4 (Columbia), From Spillimacheon south to Stoddart Creek on east then to boundary line and to Horse Thief Creek on west then to boundary line, Page 1 (Susan Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=782716
47. “Windermere District Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 21 September 1922, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069044
48. “Windermere District Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 6 July 1923, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069291
49. “New Church at Invermere Dedicated by Bishop Doull,” The Cranbrook Herald, 19 October 1923, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069571
50. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 22 August 1924, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069741
51. “Invermere Scene of Wedding,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 25 July 1932, p 10. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405979
“Two Couples Are Wed at Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 28 July 1932, p 6. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405329
52. Marriage Registration of David Smart Broadfoot and Susan Owena Nixon, 16 July 1932, Invermere, Reg No 1932-09-399639, BC Archives (Invermere B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/4fdbf3ca-2bca-4230-8110-2d4a0ced0fef
“The Broadfoot Clan of the Columbia Valley,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (May 2002), p 2 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2002_05.pdf
53. Death Registration of David Smart Broadfoot, 19 January 1945, Invermere Reg No 1945-09-656696, BC Archives (Invermere B.C.).
“The Broadfoot Clan of the Columbia Valley,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (May 2002), p 2 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2002_05.pdf
54. Death Registration of Susan Pearson, 27 April 1992, Invermere, Reg No 1992-09-008330, BC Archives (Invermere B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/24575e6e-47cb-4552-a307-7d09755262d8
55. “Windermere Scouts Camp Participated in by Twenty-Two Boys,” The Cranbrook Herald, 31 August 1923, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069798
56. “Jack Nixon Passes,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 25 April 1974, p 1.
57. David Nixon Interview, interview by Kreg O Sky, December 1983, Item AAAB5704, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-bcarchives.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/david-nixon-interview
58. “David Charles Nixon,” Memorial ID 167460855, Find A Grave Database (accessed 18 July 2022). https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/167460855/david-charles-nixon
59. Marriage Registration of David C Nixon and Barton, Jul-Aug-Sep 1945, quarter 3, vol. 2B, p. 2139, Isle Of Wight, Hampshire, England, General Register Office, Southport, England, in FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Marriage Registration Index, 1837-2005.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVDM-VD2G
60. Death Registration of David Charles Nixon, 26 May 1993, Invermere, Reg No 1993-09-014932, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/43065059-3f6f-4313-a1a6-7ee41ed67543
61. Winn Weir, “Walter J Nixon, Well Known Guide, Passes at Invermere,” 2 October 1951 [clipping, unknown newspaper], File “Nixon, Walter and Wilbur,” Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, Invermere B.C.
62. Death Registration of Arthur James Nixon, 16 March 1956, Invermere, Reg No 1956-09-003722, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/d4fbda27-9567-44c3-8e95-912c647c61e9
63. “Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 27 November 1942, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0415558
“Out of the Past,’ Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (February 2001), p 2 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2001_02.pdf
64. Marriage Registration of Walter Leigh Nixon and Mona Violet Campbell, 12 March 1946, Vancouver, Reg No 1946-09-004040, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/5f23a356-4529-4009-914b-1354498bcd60
65. “Gerald and May Cuthbert,” Valley History and the Windermere Valley Museum (August 2017), p 2 [Newsletter for the Windermere Valley Museum and Archives]. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/2017_08.pdf
66. Death Registration of Lea Walter Nixon, 10 August 1981, Invermere, Reg No 1981-09-013028, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/9a3edf94-1646-499d-a391-888222ad0258
67. Census of Canada 1921, British Columbia, District No 17 (kootenay East), Sub-District 9 (Columbia), Radium Hot Springs (Polling District), page 2, Family 26 (Wilbert Nixon). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4477501
68. British Columbia. Centennial ’71 Committee. “Wilbert Wilson Nixon, Invermere,” Pioneer medallion application forms, Item GR-1490.24.15.8, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-bcarchives.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/wilbert-wilson-nixon-invermere
69. Death Registration of Emma Mannitte Nixon, 6 March 1958, Golden, Reg No 1958-09-003121, BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/7fa6187e-0a09-4871-b09c-f5841e841c9d
70. “Wilbert W Nixon,” Memorial ID 196483968, Find A Grave Database, accessed 18 July 2022. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/196483968/wilbert-w-nixon

Other References

BC Geographical Names, “Nixon Creek,” (Accessed 2 August 2022) https://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/16954.html
BC Geographical Names, “Nixon Lake,” (Accessed 2 August 2022) https://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/16955.html

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