Hawke

Hawke Road

“The road we had come over was scarcely a road… it was climb, climb, climb… and then down, down a steep hill, car in low, single track road absolutely a shelf on the side of the mountain miles long.”43

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Firlands

Firlands Ranch, East Firlands (train station, 1914-1933), Firland Close (Radium Hot Springs)

The name “Firlands” first appears in print in early June 1899.51 The reason for choosing the name is unknown.

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Johnston (2)

Mount Johnston (up Horsethief Creek), Johnston Road (south of Invermere)

For all that the name Jim Johnston is relatively well known in local historical circles, I was surprised by how little there is recorded about him in print.

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Geary

Geary Creek (flowing into Columbia River just south of Fairmont), Geary Creek Road

“‘I can’t tell you much about [George Geary], although I knew him well. He was a reserved fellow, never said much about himself but he lived for horses, they were his life.'”74

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Hardie

Hardie Creek (flowing into Columbia Lake); Hardie Creek Road

A veritable parade of Hardie siblings lived in and/or visited the Windermere Valley from the mid 1880s into the early 1900s.

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Giant Mine (3)

Giant Mascot Road

Giant Mine, Silver Giant Mine, Giant Mascot Mine

Mining…at the Giant Mascot continued from 1951 until 1957 at a somewhat frenzied pace, and the entire operation was toted as a “‘Giant’ success story”.35

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Giant Mine (2)

Giant Road

Giant Mine, Silver Giant Mine, Giant Mascot Mine

“There is nothing today to encourage anyone but a born gambler to take the chance [on developing the property], and everything to discourage anyone to do this.”58

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Giant Mine (1)

Giant Mine Road (Spillimacheen)

Giant Mine, Silver Giant Mine, Giant Mascot Mine

The first hardrock mining claim staked in the East Kootenay… and the second hardrock location in all of the Kootenays.

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Taynton

Mount Taynton, Taynton Creek, Taynton Bay, Taynton Bowl, Taynton Road (Windermere), Taynton Trail (Invermere)

Jack Taynton was described as “a bit of a renegade.” His brother, Bill, was “soft spoken, loved flowers and displayed gentlemanly manners.” Both brothers, and their sons, ended up living or retiring alongside Windermere Lake in an area that became known as Tayntonville or Taynton Bay.

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