Grainger

Grainger Road (Canal Flats), Mount Grainger

The old Lascelles Ranch, turned Grainger property, located to the north of Canal Flats, was later in part developed into Eagles Nest Estates.

The Grainger family were long time residents of the Windermere Valley, particularly in Canal Flats, and even though they left a couple of times, they also kept coming back.

Douglas and Sarah Grainger

The patriarch of the local Grainger clan was Douglas Grainger, born 19 March 1857 in Jedburgh, Roxboroughshire, Scotland (very close to the border with England and Northumberland), to parents John Mair Grainger and Agnes Douglas.1

On 15 April 1876, Douglas married Sarah Hannah Ogden,2 born 29 January 1855 in Rochdale, Lancaster.3 At the time of the 1881 census, they were living in Oldham (north-east of Manchester) where Douglas was a tram car driver,4 and they were still in Oldham a decade later for the 1891 census, this time with Douglas being employed as a “licensed victualler” (a pub owner).5

Douglas and Sarah would have four sons, two born in England and two in Canada. The eldest was William Thomas, christened on 28 January 1877 in Blackpool, Lancashire.6 The last record I was able to find of William was on the 1891 census, at which time he was living with his family and working (at age 14) as a tram car guard.7 It is unknown if William joined the rest of the family in Canada.

The second Grainger son was Hardwick, who was christened 11 September 1881 in Failsworth, Lancashire.8 (Hardwick was Sarah’s mother’s maiden name.9)

Immigration to Canada

Sometime in 1891, following the English census, the Grainger family moved to Canada,10 initially settling on the Bow River Horse Ranch near Cochrane, before moving down the road to Banff.11

While living in Banff, a third son, Brett, was born on 10 October 1893.12 Brett was followed two years later by Hugh Stirling (or Sterling), also born in Banff, on 2 November 1895.13

To the Windermere Valley

In April 1899, the Grainger family moved once more, this time across the mountains to Canal Flats, where Douglas took over the hotel.14 They remained there for about a year, then moved down the valley to Windermere where, in April 1900, Douglas opened a hotel in the former Government building.15

At the end of the year, Douglas was granted a retail license for “Selkirk House”, in Windermere.16 It remains unclear if this is the name he gave to his hotel in the old government building, or whether this was somewhere else – there was a Selkirk Hotel, built in 1899 by the Kimpton brothers, a half mile north of Windermere on what was later Hwy 95, which is close in name, but I also have no record of its sale to Grainger.

The Grainger family were still living in Windermere in time for the 1901 census,17 although they also retained ties with Canal Flat – Douglas enumerated the census that year in Canal Flat/Thunder Hill.

Back to Canal Flats

The Grainger family returned south again later that year (1901), moving to somewhere up Findlay Creek.18 They were joined there by extended family: in autumn 1901 Sarah’s nephew (the boys’ cousin), Harry Ogden came to visit. He was suffering from tuberculosis and it was hoped that the change of climate would help his health, but he unfortunately died on 8 April 1902. He is buried at the Windermere Cemetery.19

On a slightly more cheerful note, one of Sarah’s nieces, Nellie Ogden, also came to visit, and in March 1902 was married at Cranbrook to Findlay Creek rancher John Dannell (Jack) Spencer.20 Jack died sometime later, and in February 1916 Nellie remarried, this time to Hope Brewer.21

An (In)famous Abode

In early 1902, it was announced that the Graingers intended to move into the former residence of Hon Francis Lascelles, located on the east side of Columbia Lake on the north side of Canal Flats.22

The Lascelles place had a bit of its own history. Francis J Lascelles, a younger son from a second marriage of the 4th Earl of Harewood, had arrived in the valley in about 1892 where he was known as, “a well to do man, of very peculiar disposition and habits.”23 He reportedly acquired 66 acres of Lot 110,24 where he had built, “a beautiful retreat… [and] although Mr Lascelles does not trouble himself much about ranching he has a garden that would be a treat to the epicure… With boat, fishing rod, and gun he must lead a charming life.”25

On 29 May 1901, Lascelles, “Suddenly became insane,” and shot and killed his Chinese cook.26 He was arrested and committed to the New Westminster asylum for the summer before standing trial in October. His defense counsel brought in the medical superintendent of the asylum, who testified that Lascelles had been suffering from “Acute Hallucinatory Paranoia,” and after five minutes of deliberation the jury found him not guilty.27 He immediately returned to England, where he went on to be married in 1905, and would die in May 1925.28

Frank’s departure was the Grainger’s gain, and Douglas and Sarah settled into the old Lascelles place. In 1906 their side of the lake is described as having, “almost absolute sterility, except at Grainger’s ranch which seems a lovely little place.”29 They are reported to have sold the ranch in November 1911,30 although there is some indication that Hardwick acquired the property, so it may not have gone far.31 (The ownership of various property by the Graingers in Canal Flats remains quite unclear – I get the sense that the Lascelles place was not the only property they owned, so enough to say that the old Lascelles place was owned for some period of time by some members of the Grainger family, and that family members lived elsewhere in Canal Flats as well.)

A Steady Presence

Even after (possibly) selling the Lascelles ranch, Douglas and Sarah remained in Canal Flats. Back in July 1906, Douglas had been appointed as a Justice of the Peace there,32 and in July 1913 he took over as postmaster.33 In 1918, Douglas also represented the Flats for the Windermere District branch of the Canadian Patriotic Fund,34 canvassing to raise funds for the First World War.35

Following the war, Douglas would resign his postmaster position, in January 1920, and he and Sarah moved to a house in Invermere. The two youngest sons, Brett and Stirling, went with them, and all four are listed together on the 1921 census.36 Douglas would once again be appointed as a Justice of the Peace in 1923,37 and may have been briefly appointed as an observer for the forest service on Mt Swansea (keeping watch for fires).38

Further Relocations

In early 1926, Douglas and Sarah moved again, this time to Alberta to join their son Brett after having visited him over Christmas.39 They auctioned off their household goods and put their home in Invermere up for sale,40 and by the time of the 1926 census in Alberta, Douglas, Sarah, Brett and Stirling were all living in Calgary.41

This move did not last, and they would all return to the Windermere Valley, although its also unclear how long they were gone. Brett returned in about 1930, so it is likely that Douglas and Sarah followed at around the same time, settling this time in Windermere.

In October 1932, Douglas and Sarah moved back to Invermere,42 but they had not been living there again for long when Sarah passed away, on 8 January 1933.43 Douglas followed three years later, on 25 October 1936,44 at which time all three of his sons, Hardwick, Stirling and Brett, were living in the district. Douglas also had one sister (a Mrs Leighton) living in Vulcan, Alberta.45

Both Sarah and Douglas are interred at the Windermere Cemetery (their graves are unmarked).

“The Grainger Boys”. It’s unclear which of the Grainger brothers these are. Windermere Valley Museum and Archives (Invermere B.C.)

Hardwick Grainger

Hardwick Grainger, meanwhile, was making his own way. He had been employed as a stage coach driver (a teamster),46 when he was married on 30 June 1905 to Emily Frances Bown, then living in Windermere.47 Emily was the youngest daughter of Dr John Young Bown, a member of Canada’s first Parliament who represented Brant North, Ontario from 1867 to 1872.

Hardwick and Emily’s wedding was a private one, and, “it proved a surprise to even the most intimate friends of the happy young couple.”48

Following his marriage Hardwick quit his work as a teamster and instead took up cattle ranching,49 working a property up Findlay Creek (Lot 42) “about halfway between Santo’s [Thunder Hill] and Spencer’s” (where Hardwick’s cousin Nellie then lived).50

Unfortunately Emily suffered from ill health. She had an operation at the Golden hospital in September 1906, and another at St Eugene Hospital in Cranbrook in May 1907.51 By 1911 the couple were living in Canal Flats, close to Hardwick’s parents, with Hardwick listing his occupation as a farmer.52

In May 1917, Hardwick enlisted to take part in the war as a sapper with the Canadian Engineers.53 He served until January 1918 in Canada, then was in England from February until July, and finally France until March 1919.54 He was discharged on 7 May 1919.55

Following his war service, Hardwick returned to Canal Flats where he got a job as a Game Warden out of Canal Flats, first appearing in reports in 1921.56 By this time Douglas and Sarah had moved to Invermere, leaving Hardwick to take over their property and Emily to take over as postmaster in April 1920 (she served until June 1922).57

Hardwick was appointed as a Justice of the Peace in April 1923,58 an appointment that he seems to have held (possibly not continuously) until it was rescinded in January 1960.59

He also showed a more artistic side, composing lyrics for a song titled “Where the Columbia River’s Born.” In 1924 Hardwick sent these to a New York publishing house, which had the words set to music and copyrighted.60 The song was published in sheet form: I haven’t tried too hard to try and track this sheet music down, but if someone comes across it, please let me know!

Hardwick continued to work as a game warden in Canal Flats, and possibly in 1924 as a provincial police officer,61 until spring 1925, when he and Emily sold their home to Mr and Mrs Dennis Greenwood and moved to Invermere.62 (In another tragic footnote: Dennis Greenwood was later, on 5 July 1930, shot and killed in Canal Flats by a man he had previously charged with poaching.63)

Emily Grainger passed away at the young age of 49 in Cranbrook on 28 October 1928.64

Hardwick remained in the Windermere Valley, and was living in Wilmer when he passed away 4 December 1960, just ten days following the death of his youngest brother, Stirling.65 At the time he, “was found dead …in his shack by neighbours who had noticed no sign of activity.”66 He and Emily had no children.

Following Hardwick’s death, it was noted that Stirling’s ashes would be brought from Vancouver, and that it was “probable” that he and Hardwick would be interred in the Windermere cemetery as a double funeral (there is no evidence, however, of this happening).67

Grave marker for Hardwick Grainger, at the Windermere Cemetery. Photo: Alex Weller, 2016.

Brett

The eldest of the Banff born Graingers, Brett, moved from Canal Flats to Invermere with his parents in 1920. There he can be found in newspapers as a member of a curling rink organized following the war,68 and also as a prize winner for his costume at a Valentine’s Ball at Athalmer in 1922.69

Brett worked as an automobile mechanic,70 and was an early car owner, purchasing a Nash Touring Car in Cranbrook in 1923,71 which he presumably used to win an obstacle race as part of competitions and festivities on Dominion Day in 1924.72

Later in 1924, Brett moved across the mountains to either Calgary or Claresholm (records contradict), where he settled more or less permanently, “in connection with his work.”73 It was after Brett visited his parents in late 1925 that Douglas and Sarah decided to move to Alberta, and Brett can be found living with them on the 1926 census.74

Brett maintained connections in the Valley, however, and on 17 August 1927 he was married in Invermere to Grace Carson Stewart, a telephone operator then living in Invermere (Grace is also listed as attending that Valentine’s Ball back in 1922).75 At the time of their marriage Brett was living in Calgary, and they remained there until 1930, when they returned to live, “in the vicinity of Windermere.”76

Brett and Grace remained in the Valley for seven years, then moved again, this time to Kimberley. From there it was on to Vancouver, where Brett worked as a mechanic for Northern Construction Co until 1961.77 At the time of his death, Brett is also listed as having worked as an electrician until 1964.

Brett and Grace were living in Aldergrove (Langley) when he passed away on 10 May 1966.78 The couple had two children, Raymond and Catherine (later Mrs T Hamilton).79 Grace later moved to Kelowna, where she passed away on 5 December 1981.80

Grave marker for Brett Grainger, Windermere Cemetery. Photo: Alex Weller, 2016.

Stirling

The youngest Grainger, Stirling, also followed his parents and older brother from Canal Flats to Invermere, and in early 1926 joined his family in Alberta. In between, his name can be found on a 1921 application for permission to prospect for coal just above the Canal Flats bridge.81 There’s no record that anything came of this. He was also, in 1923, appointed to a committee for the Windermere District Racing Committee (horse racing).82

Following the Alberta sojourn, Stirling, too, returned to Windermere, where he was working as a blacksmith at the time of his marriage on 4 July 1931 to Freda Elizabeth Burgess, a nurse.83

At the end of 1935 Stirling was sentence to three months jail in Nelson for supplying a First Nations man with alcohol.84

In his later years, Stirling lived with Hardwick at Wilmer, until about a year before his death when he moved to Vancouver.85 Stirling died in Vancouver on 25 November 1960.86 It’s unknown what happened to Freda, although the two do not seem to have had children.

A Note on the Property

The old Lascelles Ranch, turned Grainger property, located on the north part of Lot 110 at Canal Flats, was later in part developed into Eagles Nest Estates.87 The name “Grainger Road” remembers the presence of the Grainger family.

The name of Mount Grainger, located south-east of Canal Flats, was adopted on 6 November 1923, as suggested by Dr Charles Walcott of the Smithsonian Institute.88

See Also

Brewer
Canal Flats
Invermere
Swansea
Thunder Hill

Footnotes

1. Birth Registration Grainger (male), 19 March 1857. “Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950”, FamilySearch database (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQQ4-2H3
2. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Golden Star, 5 February 1926, p 1.
3. Death Registration of Sarah Hannah Ogden Grainger, 9 January 1933. Reg No 1933-09-476383. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) (Information also on FamilySearch database, “Canada, British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986; 1992-1993.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FLKG-M273
England and Wales Census, 1881. Lancashire, Registration District: Oldham, Piece/Folilo 4076/89, Page 31 (Douglas Geringer [sic]). FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1881.” (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q27P-1SK9
4. England and Wales Census, 1881. Lancashire, Registration District: Oldham, Piece/Folilo 4076/89, Page 31 (Douglas Geringer [sic]). FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1881.” (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q27P-1SK9
5. England and Wales Census, 1891. Lancashire, Registration District: Oldham, Enumeration District 30, Huddersfield Road, Piece/Folilo 3313/ 85, Page 2 (Douglas Grainger). FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1891.” (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QTCW-86Z
6. Christening Record for William Thomas Grainger, 28 January 1877. FamilySearch database “England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J316-WPK
7. England and Wales Census, 1891. Lancashire, Registration District: Oldham, Enumeration District 30, Huddersfield Road, Piece/Folio 3313/ 85, Page 2 (William T Grainger in household of Douglas Grainger). FamilySearch database, “England and Wales Census, 1891.” (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QTCW-5PZ
8. Christening Record for Ardwick [sic] Grainger, 11 September 1881. “England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” FamilySearch database (Accessed 20 April 2022). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NNH5-SBP
9. Death Registration of Sarah Hannah Ogden Grainger, 9 January 1933. Reg No 1933-09-476383. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) (Information also on FamilySearch database, “Canada, British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986; 1992-1993.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FLKG-M273
10. On both the 1911 and 1921 census’, Douglas, Sarah and Hardwick all report having immigrated to Canada in 1891: Fifth Census of Canada, 1911. British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District 6 (Columbia : Stoddart Creek to Southern boundary line on the east), Page 2, Family No 21, (Household of Hugham Granger [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=535890
Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. British Columbia, District No 17 (Kootenay East), Sub-District 12 (Columbia : Invermere (polling district)), Page 4, Family No 34, (Household of Douglas Grainger). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4478025
Fifth Census of Canada, 1911. British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District 6 (Columbia : Stoddart Creek to Southern boundary line on the east), Page 2, Family No 19, (Hardwick Grange [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=535873
Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. British Columbia, District No 17 (Kootenay East), Sub-District 14 (Columbia : Canal Flats (Polling district)), Page 1, Family No 3, (Hardwich Granger [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4478200
11. “One of Invermere’s Pioneer Families Plans to Move Out,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 6 February 1926, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0402220
12. Fourth Census of Canada, 1911. British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District 6 (Columbia : Stoddart Creek to Southern boundary line on the east), Page 2, Family No 21, Line 21 (Bret Granger [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=535880
13. Fourth Census of Canada, 1911. British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District 6 (Columbia : Stoddart Creek to Southern boundary line on the east), Page 2, Family No 21, Line 22 (Steeling Granger [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=535906
14. “Windermere,” The Golden Era, 21 April 1899, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0227167
15. “Local News Notes,” The Prospector (Fort Steele B.C.), 5 May 1900, p 8. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0187146
“Local News Notes,” The Prospector (Fort Steele B.C.), 30 June 1900, p 8. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0187066
16. “Licenses Granted,” The Outcrop (Canterbury B.C.), 20 December 1900, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1900/12/20/1/Ar00115.html
17. Fourth Census of Canada, 1901. British Columbia, District No 5 (Yale and Cariboo), Sub-District D (Kootenay East – North Riding), Division No 6, Page 3, Family No 33 (Douglas Pranger [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1901/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=127048
18. [no title], The Outcrop (Canterbury B.C.), 30 January 1902, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1902/01/30/1/Ar00112.html
19. [no title], The Outcrop (Canterbury B.C.), 17 April 1902, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1902/04/17/1/Ar00111.html
20. Marriage Registration of John Dannell Spencer and Nellie Ogden, 8 March 1902 (Cranbrook B.C.), Reg No 1902-09-162849. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/d1520ab9-c7c0-4ab2-909c-521da41ad158
21. Marriage Registration of Samuel Hope Brewer and Nellie Spencer, 26 February 1916 (Wilmer B.C.), Reg No 1916-09-181811. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/2ee45ad6-ded9-421f-ac37-f668ac27b830
Valley Oldtimer Passes at Age 86,’ The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 20 June 1968, p uk.
22. [no title], The Outcrop (Canterbury B.C.), 30 January 1902, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1902/01/30/1/Ar00112.html
23. “Murder at Columbia Lakes,” The Prospector (Fort Steele), 1 June 1901, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0186997
24. “The Canal Swindle,” East Kootenay Miner (Golden B.C.), 23 December 1898, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0081331
25. “Round About the Ranches,” The Golden Era, 22 July 1898, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0227308
26. “Murder at Columbia Lakes,” The Prospector (Fort Steele B.C.), 1 June 1901, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0186997
27. “The Assizes,” The Golden Era, 11 October 1901, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0227298
28. Francis John Lascelles (10 September 1925). Probate, Huntingdonshire, England, United Kingdom, Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, Great Britain. IN FamilySearch database “England and Wales, National Index of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1957.” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPLD-9D7J
29. “A Glimpse at the Kootenay Valley,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 19 July 1906, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/07/19/1/Ar00103.html
30. “Town Topics,” The Cranbrook Herald, 2 November 1911, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069875
31. Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013): p 14. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Ranches-in-the-Windermere-Valley.pdf
32. “Provincial Secretary’s Office,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 26, no 38 (20 September 1906), p 2761. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett46nogove_e3e9
33. Library and Archives Canada, Post Offices and Postmaster. Item 13737: Canal Flats in Kootenay East.
34. “Good Patriotic Work is Done at Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 26 January 1918, p 6. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0387849
35. “Prepare Campaign for YMCA Benefit,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 22 April 1918, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0389169
36. Sixth Census of Canada, 1921. British Columbia, District No 17 (Kootenay East), Sub-District 12 (Columbia : Invermere (polling district)), Page 4, Family No 34, (Douglas Grainger). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1921/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=4478025
37. “Provincial Secretary : Notice,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 63, no 10 (1 March 1923), p 715. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett63nogove_t4x8
38. “Changes in Forest Service in District of Windermere,” The Cranbrook Herald, 23 July 1925, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069313
39. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 31 December 1925, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069319
40. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 4 February 1926, p 6. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070610
41. Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1926. Alberta, District 43 (Calgary East), Sub-District No 23 (Calgary (City)), Page 28, Family No 330 (Douglas Grainger). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1926/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=1585186
42. “Col Newson is Invermere Visitor,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 17 October 1932, p 8. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404846
43. Death Registration of Sarah Hannah Grainger, 8 January 1933 (Invermere), Reg No 1933-09-476383. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.).
44. Death Registration of Douglas Grainger, 25 October 1936 (Invermere), Reg No 1936-09-520540. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.).
45. “Old Timer Dies at Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 3 November 1936, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0412354
46. “Boost for Cranbrook,” The Cranbrook Herald, 8 June 1905, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0070271
47. Marriage Registration for Hardwick Grainger and Emily Frances Bown, 30 June 1905 (Cranbrook B.C.), Reg No 1905-09-162614. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/8856c574-2d9b-40e7-b215-544cfbd6c62c
48. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 13 July 1905, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1905/07/13/1/Ar00102.html
49. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 13 July 1905, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1905/07/13/1/Ar00102.html
“District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 16 November 1905, p 1.
http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1905/11/16/1/Ar00106.html
50. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 1 February 1906, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/02/01/1/Ar00102.html
British Columbia. Crown Land Registry Services and the Office of the Surveyor General, Crown Grant No 2947/220, British Columbia Crown Land Grants Vol 220 (no 2910/0220-3009/0220), 1908. FamilySearch database: img 344 to 353 of 850. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WZ-R3CP?cc=2052510&wc=M736-ST5%3A351099401%2C353423301
51. “District Croppings,” The Outcrop (Wilmer B.C.), 20 September 1906, p 1. http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/OTC/1906/09/20/1/Ar00104.html
“Additional Locals,” The Cranbrook Herald, 30 May 1907, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069752
52. Fourth Census of Canada, 1911. British Columbia, District No 9 (Kootenay), Sub-District 6 (Columbia : Stoddart Creek to Southern boundary line on the east), Page 2, Family No 19, (Hardwick Grange [sic]). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1911/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=535873
53. “Attestation Paper : Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Force,” [p 1]. Service File of Hardwick Grainger, Reg No 2006083 (5 August 1881), Reference RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 3717 – 9, Item No 424743. Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa, Canada).
54. “Medical History of an Invalid,” [p 44]. Service File of Hardwick Grainger, Reg No 2006083 (5 August 1881), Reference RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 3717 – 9, Item No 424743. Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa, Canada).
55. “Canadian Expeditionary Force : Discharge Certificate,” [p 15]. Service File of Hardwick Grainger, Reg No 2006083 (5 August 1881), Reference RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 3717 – 9, Item No 424743. Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa, Canada).
56. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. Annual Report of the Provincial Game Warden of the Province of British Columbia 1921 (Victoria: Government Printer, 1922), p AA 20. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0226015
“Findlay Cr’k Trappers have Narrow Escape from Death in Wilds,” The Cranbrook Herald, 12 January 1922, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069005
57. Library and Archives Canada, Post Offices and Postmaster. Item 13737: Canal Flats in Kootenay East.
58. “Provincial Secretary : Notice,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 63, no 10 (1 March 1923), p 715. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett63nogove_t4x8
59. “Department of the Provincial Secretary,” The British Columbia Gazette Vol 100, no 1 ( 7 January 1960), p 4. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett0100gove
60. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 28 May 1925, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069279
Library of Congress. Copyright Office. Catalog of Copyright Entries, 1924 Music Annual Index for 1924 New Series, Vol 19, Part 3 (U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1924), p 1542. https://archive.org/embed/catalogofcopyrig193libr
61. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly. Province of British Columbia Department of Attorney-General Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the Year Ended December 31st 1924 (Victoria: Government Printer, 1925), p X 26. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0225885
62. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 7 May 1925, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069393
63. British Columbia. Conservation Officer Service. ‘Honour Roll : Game Warden Dennis Greenwood. (Accessed 21 April 2022). https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/natural-resource-stewardship/natural-resource-law-enforcement/conservation-officer-service/about-the-cos/honour-roll
64. “Mrs H Grainger Dies, Invermere,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 5 November 1928, p 9. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0404174
Death Registration of Emily Francis B Grainger, 28 October 1928 (Cranbrook), Reg No 1928-09-409498. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.)
65. Death Registration of Hardwicke Grainger, 4 December 1960 (Wilmer), Reg No 1960-09-014640. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/8208c07e-ec72-4f22-aa68-019c5dbea203
66. “Pioneer Dies at Wilmer,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 8 December 1960, p 1.
67. “Pioneer Dies at Wilmer,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 8 December 1960, p 1.
68. “Windermere in Enjoyment of Curling; First Since War,” The Cranbrook Herald, 19 February 1920, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069863
69. “Valentine Ball at Athalmer is Quite Successful,” The Cranbrook Herald, 23 February 1922, p 4. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069719
70. Marriage Registration of Brett Grainger and Grace Carson Stewart, 17 August 1927 (Invermere), Reg No 1927-09-328875. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/0f34dc34-f31f-4622-b343-3d0b64554224
71. “Local News,” The Cranbrook Herald, 27 April 1923, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069860
72. “Dominion Day Fete at Athalmer for Hospital Aid,” The Cranbrook Herald, 11 July 1924, p 6. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069444
73. “Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 1 January 1925, p 8. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069281
“Lake Windermere Notes,” The Cranbrook Herald, 11 June 1925, p 2. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069758
74. Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1926. Alberta, District 43 (Calgary East), Sub-District No 23 (Calgary (City)), Page 28, Family No 330 (Brett Grainger). https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1926/Pages/item.aspx?itemid=1585188
75. Marriage Registration of Brett Grainger and Grace Carson Stewart, 17 August 1927 (Invermere), Reg No 1927-09-328875. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/0f34dc34-f31f-4622-b343-3d0b64554224
76. “Things Happen Quickly After Invermere Indian Has Drink,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 11 September 1936, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0412454
“Brett Grainger Dies at Coast,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 1 June 1966, p 1.
77. “Brett Grainger Dies at Coast,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 1 June 1966, p 1.
78. Death Registration of Brett Grainger, 10 May 1966 (New Westminster), Reg No 1966-09-007055. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/1c2fddd4-2e0f-44f5-8d93-426913d449f5
79. “Brett Grainger Dies at Coast,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 1 June 1966, p 1.
“Notice to Creditors and Others,” The British Columbia Gazette, Vol 122, no 6 (11 February 1982), p 270. https://archive.org/embed/governmentgazett0122gove_b1r5
80. Death Registration of Grace Carson Grainger, 5 December 1981 (Kelowna), Reg No 1981-09-019268. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/2aa97b1f-311c-4132-a78b-84e40e4b9c56
81. “Columbia Land District,” The Cranbrook Herald, 2 June 1921, p 5. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0068966
82. “Windermere Dist Race Association to Hold Two Meets,” The Cranbrook Herald, 22 June 1923, p 1. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0069768
83. Marriage Registration for Hugh Stirling Grainger and Freda Elizabeth Burgess, 4 July 1931 (Windermere), Reg No 1931-09-396092. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.). https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/6d3ef709-85fd-4e3b-8ca0-d77f75746f32
84. “Is Jailed for Assaulting a Police Officer,” The Daily News (Nelson B.C.), 1 January 1936, p 3. https://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0405938
85. “Valley Oldtimer Dies at Vancouver,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 1 December 1960, p 1.
“Pioneer Dies at Wilmer,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 8 December 1960, p 1.
86. Death Registration for Hugh Sterling Grainger, 25 November 1960 (Vancouver), Reg No 1960-09-014249. BC Archives (Victoria B.C.) https://search-collections.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/Image/Genealogy/17e8afe8-f4fa-4221-8951-9c5a03bf5385
“Valley Oldtimer Dies at Vancouver,” The Lake Windermere Valley Echo, 1 December 1960, p 1.
87. Alex Weller, Ranches in the Windermere Valley (Invermere: Windermere Valley Museum and Archives, 2013): p 14. https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.83/0bs.9b1.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Ranches-in-the-Windermere-Valley.pdf
88. BC Geographical Place Names, “Mount Grainger,” (Accessed 27 April 2022). https://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/11632.html

Other References

BC Geographical Names, “Mount Grainger,” (Accessed 27 April 2022) https://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/11632.html

4 thoughts on “Grainger

  1. Thanks again for yet another interesting read, Alex. The Grainger name has not crossed my path in any of my work at the museum. Always something new and informative to enjoy from your postings.
    Hope this finds you enjoying life in Australia.

    Like

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